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Residence Hall Map

Click on a residence hall on the map or select a building from the list for more information.

111 Brown Street
111 Brown Street

111 Brown Street

A 100 year old, three story home, 111 Brown Street is Brown's smallest residence hall, housing only 13 students. Offering all the perks of living in a house, the building has a small but complete kitchen, a spacious living room, as well as a small backyard. 111 Brown Street is designated as a sophomore-only residence hall and is popular amongst students wanting easy access to a kitchen or to live in a close knit community.

  • 6 doubles; 1 single

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 104
  • Lounges: 101
  • Laundry Rooms: 106
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 104
315 Thayer Street
315 Thayer Street

315 Thayer Street

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Archibald/Bronson House
Archibald/Bronson House

Archibald/Bronson House

Archibald House is named in honor of Raymond Clare Archibald, professor of mathematics from 1909 to 1943.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Archibald House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: 523
  • Laundry Rooms: , 117
  • Bed Storage: 503
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 120
Barbour Hall
Barbour Hall

Barbour Hall

Built in 1904 and originally part of Bryant College, Barbour Hall is named in honor of Brown's tenth president, Clarence Barbour. The singles and doubles in Barbour Hall are some of the largest on campus, with each room having a sink, toilet, and shower in an adjoining room. Additionally, there is a walk-in closet in each each room.

  • 3 singles; 17 doubles
  • Room Area: doubles 16'6" x 15'
  • Windows: two 60" x 33" and two 47" x 25"

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 200
  • Lounges: 010
  • Laundry Rooms: 070
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 090
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in rear of building
Barbour Hall Apts.
Barbour Hall Apts.

Barbour Hall Apts.

Built as an addition, Barbour Hall Apartments shares its name with the adjacent building in honor of Brown's tenth president, Clarence Barbour. Each apartment contains a living/dining room, a small kitchen, a bathroom, as well as bedrooms (all singles and doubles).

  • 7 3-person apartments; 18 4-person apartments; 1 6-person apartments

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: One in each apartment
  • Lounges: 010
  • Laundry Rooms: 090
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 090
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in rear of building
Bronson House
Bronson House

Bronson House

Bronson House is named for Professor Walter C. Bronson, class of 1887, a professor of English Literature from 1892 to 1927 and Chairman of the English Department.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Bronson House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 109, 213
  • Lounges: 109, 217
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Buxton House
Buxton House

Buxton House

Buxton was named for Colonel G. Edward Buxton, Jr., '02, who was second in command of the OSS during World War II, a former Treasurer of the Providence Journal Company, and Chairman of the Housing and Development Campaign for Wriston Quadrangle.

Buxton House is home to Buxton International House, one of Brown's program houses.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 003, 014
  • Lounges: 003, 014, 120
  • Laundry Rooms: 008
  • Bed Storage: 401
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 010
Champlin Hall
Champlin Hall

Champlin Hall

Built in 1960 and renovated in 2001, Morriss and Champlin Halls were the first two buildings (Emery and Woolley Halls coming later) in a residence and dining quadrangle built for Pembroke College. Originally, the first floor of Champlin Hall housed a health center, with these rooms later being converted into residential space, many of them with private bathrooms. Champlin Hall is named for George B. Champlin, a Providence jewelry manufacturer, and Morriss Hall is named for Margaret S. Morriss, dean of the Women's College and Pembroke College from 1923 to 1950. The doubles in the residence halls serve as first-year housing, while the singles house Counselors or upperclassmen. Each floor has a small kitchen and lounge with laundry facilities adjacent. Champlin Hall is serviced by an elevator.

  • Room area: Singles 10'6" x 13'9"; Doubles 16' x 12'
  • Three six-person coed suites available
  • Windows: two 5'2" x 2''10"
  • Hall storage closet

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 110, 211, 311, 411
  • Lounges: 110
  • Laundry Rooms: 110, 221, 331, 411
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 012
  • Trash and Recycling: 007, 012
Chapin House
Chapin House

Chapin House

Chapin House is named for Dr. Charles V. Chapin, 1876, Professor of Physiology at Brown and nationally known authority on public health. Chapin spent 48 years as Superintendent of Health in Providence, and originated modern methods of treating infectious diseases in the Providence City Hospital.

Chapin House is home to both the Theta Delta Chi Fraternity and Harambee House.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 006, 014, 026
  • Lounges: 006, 014, 026, 101, 129
  • Laundry Rooms: 023
  • Bed Storage: 413
  • Bike Storage: 022
  • Trash and Recycling: 013
Diman House
Diman House

Diman House

Diman House is named for Jeremiah Lewis Diman, class of 1851, and professor of History at Brown for 17 years.

Diman House is home to both the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority and Interfaith House.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 006, 015, 027
  • Lounges: 006, 015, 027, 101, 133
  • Laundry Rooms: 028, 106
  • Bed Storage: 026
  • Bike Storage: 025
  • Trash and Recycling: 021, 024
East Andrews Hall
East Andrews Hall

East Andrews Hall

Built in 1947, Andrews Hall is named in honor of Elisha Benjamin Andrews, president of Brown University from 1889 to 1898. Andrews is nestled between Miller and Metcalf and is divided into two halves, East (even numbered rooms) and West (odd numbered rooms), each of which is serviced by an elevator.

Andrews Hall contains several first-year units surrounding three floors of upper-class singles. The rooms are large and pleasant, and each has a sink with a medicine chest. A formal dining room is located on the first floor. Once used for daily meals, this dining room is now only used for special occasions and events.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 158, 248, 348, 448
  • Lounges: 106 (Reading Room)
  • Laundry Rooms: 160
  • Bed Storage: 036
  • Bike Storage: 020
  • Trash and Recycling: 046, 156, 246, 346, 446, Dumpster at loading dock on Bowen St.
Emery Hall
Emery Hall

Emery Hall

Built in 1963 and renovated in 2002, Emery and Woolley Halls are named after Anne Crosby Emery Allinson, second dean of Pembroke College, and Mary Emma Woolley, one of the first two women graduates in 1894. Together with Morriss-Champlin, Emery-Woolley completes the Pembroke Quadrangle. Both buildings consist of clusters of two or three rooms that share a single-use bathroom and a hall storage closet. The doubles in the residence halls serve as first-year housing, while the singles house upperclassmen. Each floor has a small kitchen and lounge with laundry facilities adjacent. Emery Hall is serviced by an elevator.

  • Room area: singles 10'6" x 13'9"; doubles 15' x 12'
  • Verney-Woolley dining hall

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 012
  • Trash and Recycling: 006
Everett/Poland House
Everett/Poland House

Everett/Poland House

Everett House is named for a member of the class of 1885, Professor Walter G. Everett, professor of Latin, philosophy, and natural theology. He taught at Brown from 1890 to 1930, and served as President pro-tempore of the University in 1912-1913.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Everett House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: 528
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Goddard House
Goddard House

Goddard House

Goddard House is named for William Giles Goddard, a member of the class of 1812, professor of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics and of "Belles-Lettres" for 17 years, and Trustee and Fellow of the University.

Goddard House is home to both the Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity and Delta Phi Fraternity.

  • Room area: single 15'; x 10'6" double 15'x 12'
  • One 48" x 48" window
  • One or two small walk-in closets
  • 64 singles; 24 doubles; Suite A: 3 doubles
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 008, 021, 033
  • Lounges: 008, 021, 042, 101, 148
  • Laundry Rooms: 018, 106
  • Bed Storage: 029
  • Bike Storage: 017
  • Trash and Recycling: 013
Grad Center A
Grad Center A

Grad Center A

Built in 1968, the Graduate Center consists of four residential towers connected by bridge walkways to a common building., which houses the Bear's Lair Student Center (with pinball, video games, projection TV, and exercise room) as well as the Brown University Faculty and Graduate School Club and the Office of Summer and Continuing Studies. There are three entrances to the towers - two on Thayer Street with spiral staircases leading to the terrace and one on Charlesfield Street.

The suites in the Graduate Center vary in size between four and six singles per suite, with the majority containing five. Each suite shares a common hallway and a bathroom. Each bedroom has its own phone line. The rooms are fairly large, carpeted, and contain generous closet space. Each floor of a Tower contains four suites, one on each corner of the building, connected by common corridors and two staircases.

All suites in Towers D are designated as sophomore-only.

  • Room area: 10'6" x 10'3"
  • Windows: 5'7" x 7'2"
  • Closet nook with light in each room

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 225, 526
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 121
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 225, 526, Under first floor stairs
Grad Center B
Grad Center B

Grad Center B

Built in 1968, the Graduate Center consists of four residential towers connected by bridge walkways to a common building., which houses the Bear's Lair Student Center (with pinball, video games, projection TV, and exercise room) as well as the Brown University Faculty and Graduate School Club and the Office of Summer and Continuing Studies. There are three entrances to the towers - two on Thayer Street with spiral staircases leading to the terrace and one on Charlesfield Street.

The suites in the Graduate Center vary in size between four and six singles per suite, with the majority containing five. Each suite shares a common hallway and a bathroom. Each bedroom has its own phone line. The rooms are fairly large, carpeted, and contain generous closet space. Each floor of a Tower contains four suites, one on each corner of the building, connected by common corridors and two staircases.

All suites in Towers D are designated as sophomore-only.

  • Room area: 10'6" x 10'3"
  • Windows: 5'7" x 7'2"
  • Closet nook with light in each room

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 225, 536
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 133
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 225, 536, Under first floor stairs
Grad Center C
Grad Center C

Grad Center C

Built in 1968, the Graduate Center consists of four residential towers connected by bridge walkways to a common building., which houses the Bear's Lair Student Center (with pinball, video games, projection TV, and exercise room) as well as the Brown University Faculty and Graduate School Club and the Office of Summer and Continuing Studies. There are three entrances to the towers - two on Thayer Street with spiral staircases leading to the terrace and one on Charlesfield Street.

The suites in the Graduate Center vary in size between four and six singles per suite, with the majority containing five. Each suite shares a common hallway and a bathroom. Each bedroom has its own phone line. The rooms are fairly large, carpeted, and contain generous closet space. Each floor of a Tower contains four suites, one on each corner of the building, connected by common corridors and two staircases.

All suites in Towers D are designated as sophomore-only.

  • Room area: 10'6" x 10'3"
  • Windows: 5'7" x 7'2"
  • Closet nook with light in each room

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 336, 536
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 120
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 336, 536, Under first floor stairs
Grad Center D
Grad Center D

Grad Center D

Built in 1968, the Graduate Center consists of four residential towers connected by bridge walkways to a common building., which houses the Bear's Lair Student Center (with pinball, video games, projection TV, and exercise room) as well as the Brown University Faculty and Graduate School Club and the Office of Summer and Continuing Studies. There are three entrances to the towers - two on Thayer Street with spiral staircases leading to the terrace and one on Charlesfield Street.

The suites in the Graduate Center vary in size between four and six singles per suite, with the majority containing five. Each suite shares a common hallway and a bathroom. Each bedroom has its own phone line. The rooms are fairly large, carpeted, and contain generous closet space. Each floor of a Tower contains four suites, one on each corner of the building, connected by common corridors and two staircases.

All suites in Towers D are designated as sophomore-only.

  • Room area: 10'6" x 10'3"
  • Windows: 5'7" x 7'2"
  • Closet nook with light in each room

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 215, 535
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 130
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 215, 535, Under first floor stairs
Gregorian Quad A
Gregorian Quad A

Gregorian Quad A

Renamed in honor of Brown's 16th president, Vartan Gregorian Quad opened in September 1991 as the Thayer Street Quadrangle. More affectionately known as New Dorm, Gregorian Quad is divided into two L-shaped wings with a grassy quadrangle in the middle. The Quad is also home to Josiah's snack bar, named after famed Professor of Psychoceramics Josiah S. Carberry.

The fourth floor of each building houses a number of singles and doubles, while the lower floors consist of suites. Every suite is carpeted and consists of a living room, furnished with couches, tables and a sink, surrounded by single bedrooms. There are closets in the bedrooms and in the hallway. Suites on the second and third floors feature 8' bay windows in the living room.

  • Building A: 18 singles; 3 doubles; 4 triples; 26 quads; 6 quints
  • Building B: 28 singles; 4 doubles; 23 quads; 4 quints
  • Room area: living room from 12' x 14' to 14' x 18'; bedrooms from 8' x 14' to 10' x 13'
  • Eight washers, eight dryers shared by both buildings
  • Elevators in each building; vending machines in basement, and snack bar on ground floor of Building A

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 255, 355, 455
  • Lounges: 255, 355, 455
  • Laundry Rooms: 007
  • Bed Storage: 003
  • Bike Storage: 104, 119
  • Trash and Recycling: 010
Gregorian Quad B
Gregorian Quad B

Gregorian Quad B

Renamed in honor of Brown's 16th president, Vartan Gregorian Quad opened in September 1991 as the Thayer Street Quadrangle. More affectionately known as New Dorm, Gregorian Quad is divided into two L-shaped wings with a grassy quadrangle in the middle. The Quad is also home to Josiah's snack bar, named after famed Professor of Psychoceramics Josiah S. Carberry.

The fourth floor of each building houses a number of singles and doubles, while the lower floors consist of suites. Every suite is carpeted and consists of a living room, furnished with couches, tables and a sink, surrounded by single bedrooms. There are closets in the bedrooms and in the hallway. Suites on the second and third floors feature 8' bay windows in the living room.

  • Building A: 18 singles; 3 doubles; 4 triples; 26 quads; 6 quints
  • Building B: 28 singles; 4 doubles; 23 quads; 4 quints
  • Room area: living room from 12' x 14' to 14' x 18'; bedrooms from 8' x 14' to 10' x 13'
  • Eight washers, eight dryers shared by both buildings
  • Elevators in each building; vending machines in basement, and snack bar on ground floor of Building A

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 152, 252, 352, 452
  • Lounges: 152, 252, 352, 452
  • Laundry Rooms: 001
  • Bed Storage:
  • Bike Storage: 158
  • Trash and Recycling: 002
Harkness House
Harkness House

Harkness House

Harkness House is named for Professor Albert Harkness, a member of the class of 1842 and professor of Classics at Brown from 1855 to 1892. Harkness was also a founder of the American Philological Association and the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, and a Fellow of the University from 1904 to 1907.

Harkness House is home to both Technology House and Art House.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 006, 014, 026
  • Lounges: 006, 014, 026, 101, 129
  • Laundry Rooms: 023, 106
  • Bed Storage: 029
  • Bike Storage: 021
  • Trash and Recycling: 013
Hegeman A
Hegeman A

Hegeman A

Built in 1926, Hegeman Hall embodies the Colonial style of architecture and is named for John R. Hegeman, once president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Most of Hegeman is composed of triples, with three single bedrooms and a small unfurnished living room, however there are a limited number of singles and doubles. Hegeman is built in five towers, A through E, of which towers B through E are connected through the basement.

  • Room Area: triples 12'5" x 7' bedrooms

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Hegeman B
Hegeman B

Hegeman B

Built in 1926, Hegeman Hall embodies the Colonial style of architecture and is named for John R. Hegeman, once president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Most of Hegeman is composed of triples, with three single bedrooms and a small unfurnished living room, however there are a limited number of singles and doubles. Hegeman is built in five towers, A through E, of which towers B through E are connected through the basement.

  • Room Area: triples 12'5" x 7' bedrooms

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Hegeman C
Hegeman C

Hegeman C

Built in 1926, Hegeman Hall embodies the Colonial style of architecture and is named for John R. Hegeman, once president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Most of Hegeman is composed of triples, with three single bedrooms and a small unfurnished living room, however there are a limited number of singles and doubles. Hegeman is built in five towers, A through E, of which towers B through E are connected through the basement.

  • Room Area: triples 12'5" x 7' bedrooms

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 006
  • Lounges: 008
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: 004
  • Bike Storage: Basement hallway
  • Trash and Recycling: Basement hallway
Hegeman D
Hegeman D

Hegeman D

Built in 1926, Hegeman Hall embodies the Colonial style of architecture and is named for John R. Hegeman, once president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Most of Hegeman is composed of triples, with three single bedrooms and a small unfurnished living room, however there are a limited number of singles and doubles. Hegeman is built in five towers, A through E, of which towers B through E are connected through the basement.

  • Room Area: triples 12'5" x 7' bedrooms

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 008
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: hallway
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Hegeman E
Hegeman E

Hegeman E

Built in 1926, Hegeman Hall embodies the Colonial style of architecture and is named for John R. Hegeman, once president of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. Most of Hegeman is composed of triples, with three single bedrooms and a small unfurnished living room, however there are a limited number of singles and doubles. Hegeman is built in five towers, A through E, of which towers B through E are connected through the basement.

  • Room Area: triples 12'5" x 7' bedrooms

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms:
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 011
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Hope College
Hope College

Hope College

Built in 1822 and named after Hope Brown Ives, Hope College is the oldest residence hall on campus. In 1959, Hope College was reconstructed into the building that stands today. A four story brick building on the Main Green, the building's location is often considered amongst the best of all the residence halls. Hope College is currently used as a second-year building.

  • 16 singles; 30 doubles
  • Room area: singles 8'6" x 12"
  • Windows 2'11" x 5'2"
  • 10 outlets
  • 2 washers, 2 dryers
  • Appleget Lounge on first floor

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 007, 315
  • Lounges: 016
  • Laundry Rooms: 015
  • Bed Storage: 017
  • Bike Storage: 006
  • Trash and Recycling: 006
Jameson/Mead House
Jameson/Mead House

Jameson/Mead House

Professor John F. Jameson, commemorated by Jameson House, taught history at Brown from 1888 to 1901. He later became the head of the history department at the University of Chicago, and Director of the Department of Historical Research of the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Jameson House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: 421
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
King House
King House

King House

Acquired in 1969 when Brown purchased the building from Bryant College, King House was originally named Taft and was used as Bryant's administration building. In 1974, the building was renamed King House in honor of Lida Shaw King, former dean of Pembroke College. King House is now home to St. Anthony Hall, one of Brown's program houses.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 108
  • Lounges: 102, 104
  • Laundry Rooms: 007
  • Bed Storage: 008
  • Bike Storage: Outside near back hallway
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in rear of building
Littlefield Hall
Littlefield Hall

Littlefield Hall

Built in 1925, Littlefield Hall adjoins Maxcy Hall (once a residence hall and now home to the Sociology Department) and his named for George L. Littlefield, president of the First National Bank of Providence. The hall is composed of primarily doubles designated for sophomore-year housing.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 110
  • Lounges: 210, 310, 410
  • Laundry Rooms: 011
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 011
  • Trash and Recycling: 008
Machado House
Machado House

Machado House

Built in 1912, Machado House (formerly Ellen Dexter Sharp House) is a two and a half story, brick, Elizabethan Revival style house. Brown purchased the house in 1955 from the Rhode Island School of Design and in 1975 constructed an addition at the rear of the building. Dedicated in 1989 as Antonio Machado House (in honor of the Spanish poet), the house is now home to two of Brown's program houses, Hispanic House and French House.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 015, 208, 215
  • Lounges: 015, 202, 204, 215
  • Laundry Rooms: 209
  • Bed Storage: 317
  • Bike Storage: 210
  • Trash and Recycling: 015, 215, Dumpster in rear of building
Marcy House
Marcy House

Marcy House

Marcy House is named after a member of the class of 1808 William L. Marcy, Comptroller of the State of New York, U.S. Senator, Governor of New York for three terms, Secretary of War, and U.S. Secretary of State. The highest peak in the Adirondacks, Mount Marcy, near Lake Placid, also bears his name.

Marcy House is home to both the Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity and Zeta Delta Xi Fraternity.

  • Room area: single 15'x 10'6" double 15'x 12'
  • One 48" x 48" window
  • One or two small walk-in closets
  • 46 singles; 26 doubles; 1 triple; Suite A: 4 doubles; Suite B: 3 doubles
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 008, 019, 038
  • Lounges: 008, 019, 038, 101, 140
  • Laundry Rooms: 028
  • Bed Storage: 427
  • Bike Storage: 029
  • Trash and Recycling: 025
Mead House
Mead House

Mead House

Mead House bears the name of Dr. Albert Mead, professor of Biology from 1895 to 1930. He was also vice-president of the University from 1925 to 1936, and President pro-tempore in the years 1925 to 1932.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Mead House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: None
  • Lounges: 407
  • Laundry Rooms: 009
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 006
Metcalf Hall
Metcalf Hall

Metcalf Hall

Built in 1919 and named for Stephen O. Metcalf, Metcalf Hall was the second residence hall built on the campus of the Women's College (Miller Hall being the first). The top floor of Metcalf has sloped ceilings, and is a first year community.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 223, 303
  • Lounges: 115
  • Laundry Rooms: 010
  • Bed Storage: 009
  • Bike Storage: 011
  • Trash and Recycling: 223, 303, Dumpster in rear of building
Middle Caswell Hall
Middle Caswell Hall

Middle Caswell Hall

Caswell is restricted entirely to sophomores. One of the older dorms on campus (built in 1903), Caswell Hall features spacious rooms, many of which have non-functioning fireplaces and window seats. Caswell is divided into three sections - North, Middle, and South - which connect only in the basement. Each section contains 15 doubles and tends to become tight-knit.

  • Room area: 14'9" x 14'6"
  • Windows: three 3' x 5'10" in end rooms, two in middle rooms
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers
  • Bathroom on each floor

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 207
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: hallway
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 005a
Miller Hall
Miller Hall

Miller Hall

Built in 1910, Miller Hall is a Colonial style brick building with white limestone trim. Named after Mr. and Mrs. Horace G. Miller, the hall was originally built as a women's residence hall. Today, Miller hall serves as housing for First Year Students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 202, 324
  • Lounges: 107
  • Laundry Rooms: 012
  • Bed Storage: 036
  • Bike Storage: 010
  • Trash and Recycling: 202, 324, Basement hallway
Minden Hall
Minden Hall

Minden Hall

Formerly a hotel and then a Johnson & Wales University residence hall, Minden Hall underwent extensive renovation in 2002 and now houses Brown upperclassmen. Minden is unique in its configuration of having many rooms organized into singles, doubles, and three-person suites that contain a private bathroom. Not all bedroom doors in suites are lockable because of the bathroom configuration and some suites do not contain showers and instead rely upon shower rooms off the hall. Minden has a kitchen on its first floor containing two ovens but has no stove tops.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 104B
  • Lounges: 104
  • Laundry Rooms: 102
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 107
  • Trash and Recycling: 102
Morriss Hall
Morriss Hall

Morriss Hall

Built in 1960 and renovated in 2001, Morriss and Champlin Halls were the first two buildings (Emery and Woolley Halls coming later) in a residence and dining quadrangle built for Pembroke College. Originally, the first floor of Champlin Hall housed a health center, with these rooms later being converted into residential space, many of them with private bathrooms. Champlin Hall is named for George B. Champlin, a Providence jewelry manufacturer, and Morriss Hall is named for Margaret S. Morriss, dean of the Women's College and Pembroke College from 1923 to 1950. The doubles in the residence halls serve as first-year housing, while the singles house Counselors or upperclassmen. Each floor has a small kitchen and lounge with laundry facilities adjacent. Champlin Hall is serviced by an elevator.

  • Room area: Singles 10'6" x 13'9"; Doubles 16' x 12'
  • Three six-person coed suites available
  • Windows: two 5'2" x 2''10"
  • Hall storage closet

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 211, 311, 411
  • Lounges: 115
  • Laundry Rooms: 211a, 311a, 411a
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 012
  • Trash and Recycling: 007, 012
New Pembroke #1
New Pembroke #1

New Pembroke #1

New Pembroke is a four-building complex on the corner of Bowen and Thayer Streets designed by Donlyn Lyndon, Professor and Chairman of the architecture department at M.I.T., an architect with the firm Moore, Lyndon and Tumbull of Boston and New Haven, and Chairman of the Board of Lyndon Associates, Inc.

The buildings were designed to blend well into an area occupied by small stores and large 19th century homes. The architects were so successful in achieving this objective that the design was awarded first place from among 670 entries in an annual nationwide competition sponsored by the magazine Progressive Architecture.

Rooms are grouped into sets of three or four with kitchens and lounges for every twelve to sixteen students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 207
  • Lounges: 203, 303, 403
  • Laundry Rooms:
  • Bed Storage:
  • Bike Storage: 120
  • Trash and Recycling: 120, Dumpster at end of Morriss
New Pembroke #2
New Pembroke #2

New Pembroke #2

New Pembroke is a four-building complex on the corner of Bowen and Thayer Streets designed by Donlyn Lyndon, Professor and Chairman of the architecture department at M.I.T., an architect with the firm Moore, Lyndon and Tumbull of Boston and New Haven, and Chairman of the Board of Lyndon Associates, Inc.

The buildings were designed to blend well into an area occupied by small stores and large 19th century homes. The architects were so successful in achieving this objective that the design was awarded first place from among 670 entries in an annual nationwide competition sponsored by the magazine Progressive Architecture.

Rooms are grouped into sets of three or four with kitchens and lounges for every twelve to sixteen students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 101
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway
  • Bed Storage: 006
  • Bike Storage:
  • Trash and Recycling: , Dumpster at end of Morriss
New Pembroke #3
New Pembroke #3

New Pembroke #3

New Pembroke is a four-building complex on the corner of Bowen and Thayer Streets designed by Donlyn Lyndon, Professor and Chairman of the architecture department at M.I.T., an architect with the firm Moore, Lyndon and Tumbull of Boston and New Haven, and Chairman of the Board of Lyndon Associates, Inc.

The buildings were designed to blend well into an area occupied by small stores and large 19th century homes. The architects were so successful in achieving this objective that the design was awarded first place from among 670 entries in an annual nationwide competition sponsored by the magazine Progressive Architecture.

Rooms are grouped into sets of three or four with kitchens and lounges for every twelve to sixteen students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 101, 212a
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway
  • Bed Storage:
  • Bike Storage:
  • Trash and Recycling: , Dumpster at end of Morriss
New Pembroke #4
New Pembroke #4

New Pembroke #4

New Pembroke is a four-building complex on the corner of Bowen and Thayer Streets designed by Donlyn Lyndon, Professor and Chairman of the architecture department at M.I.T., an architect with the firm Moore, Lyndon and Tumbull of Boston and New Haven, and Chairman of the Board of Lyndon Associates, Inc.

The buildings were designed to blend well into an area occupied by small stores and large 19th century homes. The architects were so successful in achieving this objective that the design was awarded first place from among 670 entries in an annual nationwide competition sponsored by the magazine Progressive Architecture.

Rooms are grouped into sets of three or four with kitchens and lounges for every twelve to sixteen students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 216, 218
  • Lounges: 208
  • Laundry Rooms: 117
  • Bed Storage:
  • Bike Storage:
  • Trash and Recycling: , Dumpster at end of Morriss
North Caswell Hall
North Caswell Hall

North Caswell Hall

Caswell is restricted entirely to sophomores. One of the older dorms on campus (built in 1903), Caswell Hall features spacious rooms, many of which have non-functioning fireplaces and window seats. Caswell is divided into three sections - North, Middle, and South - which connect only in the basement. Each section contains 15 doubles and tends to become tight-knit.

  • Room area: 14'9" x 14'6"
  • Windows: three 3' x 5'10" in end rooms, two in middle rooms
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers
  • Bathroom on each floor

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 211
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms:
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
North Wayland House
North Wayland House

North Wayland House

Wayland House is the only building on Wriston Quadrangle that does not contain a fraternity, sorority, or program house. The first floor of Wayland is occupied by the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Auxiliary Housing. The doubles on the upper floors are home to a freshman unit, while the singles and fourth floor suites are occupied by upperclassmen.

  • 23 singles; 38 doubles; Suite A: 3 singles, 2 doubles; Suite B: 3 singles, 2 doubles
  • Room area: single 15' x 10'6"; double 15' x 12'
  • One 48" x 48" window
  • One or two small walk-in closets
  • Lounge in North and South Wayland

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 005
  • Lounges: 005, 101
  • Laundry Rooms: 023
  • Bed Storage: 414
  • Bike Storage: 009
  • Trash and Recycling: 012
Olney House
Olney House

Olney House

Olney was named in honor of Richard Olney, class of 1856, Attorney General to President Cleveland, and U.S. Secretary of State.

Olney House is home to the Sigma Chi Fraternity, Cooking House, and Delta Tau Fraternity.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 008, 014, 029
  • Lounges: 008, 014, 029, 101, 135
  • Laundry Rooms: 024
  • Bed Storage: 413
  • Bike Storage: 011
  • Trash and Recycling: 013
Perkins Hall
Perkins Hall

Perkins Hall

Built in 1960, Perkins Hall was originally constructed by Bryant College and named Gardner Hall. Brown bought the building in 1969, when Bryant moved to Smithfield, Rhode Island. In 1974, the building was renamed as Perkins Hall in honor of Judge Fred B. Perkins '19. Today, the building houses near entirely second-year students, with the only singles in the building used to house Counselors.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 039, 135, 223, 323
  • Lounges: 038, 040
  • Laundry Rooms: 020
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 001
  • Trash and Recycling: 029, Dumpster in rear of building
Plantations House
Plantations House

Plantations House

Originally used as a study center and a place to stay overnight for commuter students, Plantations House now serves as one of the smallest residence halls on campus, housing 16 students total. The house, located at 219 Bowen Street, features ample common space on the first floor as well as a full sized kitchen with pantry.

  • 5 singles; 4 doubles; 1 triple

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 106
  • Lounges: 103, 104
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 106, Dumpster at loading dock on Bowen St.
Poland House
Poland House

Poland House

Poland House is named for Professor William C. Poland, class of 1868, teacher of Greek and Latin from 1870 to 1892, and professor of art history from 1892 to 1950.

Part of Keeney Quadrangle, which opened in 1957 as West Quadrangle (later renamed in honor of President Barnaby Keeney), Poland House is part of the largest self-contained residential unit on campus. About 600 students live in the six connected buildings. The six buildings are arranged in alphabetical order, forming a figure eight, starting with Archibald House at the corner of Brown and Benevolent, and ending with Poland House parallel to Benevolent Street.

The rooms are primarily doubles, although there are some singles scattered throughout. Most of the doubles are filled with first-year students and the singles are occupied by Counselors or upper-class students.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 209
  • Lounges: 512
  • Laundry Rooms: 209
  • Bed Storage: 528
  • Bike Storage: 109, 111
  • Trash and Recycling: 122
Sears House
Sears House

Sears House

Sears is named for Barnas Sears, a member of the class of 1825, and President of the University following President Francis Wayland during the years 1855 to 1867.

Sears House is home to both the Alpha Chi Omega Sorority and Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity.

  • Room area: single 15' x 10'6"; double 15' x 12'
  • One 48" x 48" window
  • One or two small walk-in closets
  • 37 singles; 32 doubles; Suite A: 3 singles, 2 doubles; Suite B: 3 singles, 2 doubles
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 014, 026
  • Lounges: 006, 014, 026, 101, 129
  • Laundry Rooms: 023, 106
  • Bed Storage: 413
  • Bike Storage: 011
  • Trash and Recycling: 013
Slater Hall
Slater Hall

Slater Hall

Built in 1879, Slater Hall is named in honor of Horatio Nelson Slater. Located on the Main Green between University Hall and Rhode Island Hall, Slater Hall's large rooms with high ceilings and large windows make it an attractive residence hall for upperclassmen. Many of the triples and quads located in the building contain multiple rooms. Residents must share bathrooms, which are located on the second and third floors.

  • 5 quads; 4 triples; 8 doubles; 8 singles
  • Room area: quad/triple 6'3" x 14 or 7'6" x 12'6"; living room 14' x 13'
  • Windows: 2'9" x 6'4"

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 103
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 008
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 050, 051
  • Trash and Recycling: 103, Basement
South Caswell Hall
South Caswell Hall

South Caswell Hall

Caswell is restricted entirely to sophomores. One of the older dorms on campus (built in 1903), Caswell Hall features spacious rooms, many of which have non-functioning fireplaces and window seats. Caswell is divided into three sections - North, Middle, and South - which connect only in the basement. Each section contains 15 doubles and tends to become tight-knit.

  • Room area: 14'9" x 14'6"
  • Windows: three 3' x 5'10" in end rooms, two in middle rooms
  • 3 washers, 3 dryers
  • Bathroom on each floor

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 203
  • Lounges: 002
  • Laundry Rooms: 010B
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 001
  • Trash and Recycling: 002
South Wayland House
South Wayland House

South Wayland House

Wayland House is the only building on Wriston Quadrangle that does not contain a fraternity, sorority, or program house. The first floor of Wayland is occupied by the Office of Residential Life and the Office of Auxiliary Housing. The doubles on the upper floors are home to a freshman unit, while the singles and fourth floor suites are occupied by upperclassmen.

  • 23 singles; 38 doubles; Suite A: 3 singles, 2 doubles; Suite B: 3 singles, 2 doubles
  • Room area: single 15' x 10'6"; double 15' x 12'
  • One 48" x 48" window
  • One or two small walk-in closets
  • Lounge in North and South Wayland

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 043
  • Lounges: 043, 101, 147
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: 041
  • Trash and Recycling: 038
West Andrews Hall
West Andrews Hall

West Andrews Hall

Built in 1947, Andrews Hall is named in honor of Elisha Benjamin Andrews, president of Brown University from 1889 to 1898. Andrews is nestled between Miller and Metcalf and is divided into two halves, East (even numbered rooms) and West (odd numbered rooms), each of which is serviced by an elevator.

Andrews Hall contains several first-year units surrounding three floors of upper-class singles. The rooms are large and pleasant, and each has a sink with a medicine chest. A formal dining room is located on the first floor. Once used for daily meals, this dining room is now only used for special occasions and events.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 047, 245, 345, 445
  • Lounges: 047, 113 (Media Room)
  • Laundry Rooms: None
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 043, 153, 243, 343, 443, Dumpster at loading dock on Bowen St.
West House
West House

West House

West House, a three story house located on the corner of Brown and Meeting Streets is home to Environmental House, one of Brown's program houses.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 102
  • Lounges: 104
  • Laundry Rooms: 106
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: 102
Woolley Hall
Woolley Hall

Woolley Hall

Built in 1963 and renovated in 2002, Emery and Woolley Halls are named after Anne Crosby Emery Allinson, second dean of Pembroke College, and Mary Emma Woolley, one of the first two women graduates in 1894. Together with Morriss-Champlin, Emery-Woolley completes the Pembroke Quadrangle. Both buildings consist of clusters of two or three rooms that share a single-use bathroom and a hall storage closet. The doubles in the residence halls serve as first-year housing, while the singles house upperclassmen. Each floor has a small kitchen and lounge with laundry facilities adjacent. Emery Hall is serviced by an elevator.

  • Room area: singles 10'6" x 13'9"; doubles 15' x 12'
  • Verney-Woolley dining hall

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: 101, 201, 301, 401
  • Lounges: None
  • Laundry Rooms: 101a, 201a, 301a, 401a
  • Bed Storage: None
  • Bike Storage: None
  • Trash and Recycling: None
Young Orchard #10
Young Orchard #10

Young Orchard #10

Opened in 1973, the Young Orchard Apartments were built on the site of four former Bryant University residence halls. The apartment complex consists of three nearly identical towers. Most floors contain four apartments, with each apartment containing four single bedrooms (with few exceptions), a living room, a small kitchen, and bathroom.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: One in each apartment
  • Lounges: One in each apartment
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway near 142
  • Bed Storage: 131
  • Bike Storage: Hallway near 143
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in parking lot
Young Orchard #2
Young Orchard #2

Young Orchard #2

Opened in 1973, the Young Orchard Apartments were built on the site of four former Bryant University residence halls. The apartment complex consists of three nearly identical towers. Most floors contain four apartments, with each apartment containing four single bedrooms (with few exceptions), a living room, a small kitchen, and bathroom.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: One in each apartment
  • Lounges: One in each apartment
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway near 142
  • Bed Storage: 131
  • Bike Storage: Hallway near 143
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in parking lot
Young Orchard #4
Young Orchard #4

Young Orchard #4

Opened in 1973, the Young Orchard Apartments were built on the site of four former Bryant University residence halls. The apartment complex consists of three nearly identical towers. Most floors contain four apartments, with each apartment containing four single bedrooms (with few exceptions), a living room, a small kitchen, and bathroom.

Residence Hall Services:

  • Kitchens: One in each apartment
  • Lounges: One in each apartment
  • Laundry Rooms: Hallway near 142
  • Bed Storage: 131
  • Bike Storage: Hallway near 143
  • Trash and Recycling: Dumpster in parking lot